Freedom | Move Review

If you missed this movie when it aired in cinemas, now is your chance to recapture the emotion and power of Freedom.

In a time preceding the American Civil War resulting in the emancipation of slaves in the South, two men make a journey seeking freedom 100 years apart, but connected by a life-changing thread.

After generations of his family working and being sold as slaves, Samuel Woodward takes an opportunity to flee the Monroe Plantation with his wife, son and grandmother.  A treacherous journey to be taken, the risks are high and costly but thanks to the help of Thomas Garrett and his group of slave smugglers known as The Underground Railway, the opportunity arises. Together, with the help of a local theatre group, creative plans are devised to protect and hide this family as they escape from the oppression of the South.

With Monroe’s men in hot pursuit, the situation becomes increasingly dangerous and Samuel struggles to believe in a God who would place them in this situation to begin with. As they travel, grandmother Adira (Phyllis Bash) comforts them with words of wisdom and stories of a man named John Newton who made a different journey to freedom 100 years earlier. An unlikely hero – the captain of a slave ship – finds freedom for his soul, and the kindness he shows to a motherless young slave-boy would impact the Woodward family for generations to come.

“Learn from those who have gone before you,” -Adira

Beautiful hymns such as Amazing Grace, Swing Low, Sweet Chariot, and Fanny Crosby’s Pass Me Not, O Gentle Saviour, help steer the course of the film like a sturdy ship with soulful tones reflecting the enduring faith of a people bound in body but hopeful in spirit.

The journey from slavery to freedom comes in many forms. The freedom of the body, freedom of the mind and freedom of the soul, and Adira’s wise words echo again: “With forgiveness comes true freedom.”

This powerful movie is based on true events and the remarkable courage of people such as Frederick Douglass – abolitionist, author, diplomat; John Newton – captain of slave ships turned abolitionist (composer of hymn – Amazing Grace); Thomas Garrett – abolitionist and leader of The Underground Railway. These characters are brought to life by a cast of superb actors including Cuba Gooding Jr (Selma) and William Sadler (Die Hard 2) – you may even spot director Peter Cousins in his appearance as land owner Seaton Cervisse.

Directed by Peter Cousens, and with beautiful visuals created by Dean Cundy (director of photography) this film takes us back to a time of bondage and slavery and draws our attention to our current world in which we are unfortunately in the midst of unprecedented slavery once again.

With current statistics showing that slavery has never been as high as it is today, the call for heroes is more necessary than ever. This inspiring film is a timely reminder to retain our awareness of the millions of victims trafficked at an alarming rate throughout the world in our present day.
Be inspired by this moving and powerful film – Freedom.

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